Calendar

Aug
23
Tue
MASc Thesis Presentation: Adam Parker – Using incremental emission factors to evaluate the greenhouse gas impact of electric vehicle deployment
Aug 23 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Using incremental emission factors to evaluate the greenhouse gas impact of electric vehicle deployment (MASc Thesis Presentation)
Candidate: Adam Parker
Supervisor: Prof. Daniel Posen
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 at 10 a.m.
Via Zoom: https://utoronto.zoom.us/j/85646877909

Sep
7
Wed
MASc Thesis Presentation: Laurence Yin – Long-Term Stiffness and Shrinkage Strain Monitoring of Reinforced Concrete Elements
Sep 7 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Long-Term Stiffness and Shrinkage Strain Monitoring of Reinforced Concrete Elements  (MASc Thesis Presentation)Candidate: Laurence YinSupervisors: Professor Oh-Sung Kwon , Professor Evan BentzWednesday, September 7, at 10 a.m. Via Zoom: https://utoronto.zoom.us/j/83637129903

Sep
8
Thu
PhD Departmental Defence: Sanjana Hossain – Data fusion methods to support travel demand modelling in emerging contexts
Sep 8 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Data fusion methods to support travel demand modelling in emerging contexts (PhD Departmental Defence)
Candidate: Sanjana Hossain
Supervisor: Prof. Khandker Nurul Habib
Thursday, September 8,2022 at noon
Galbraith Building, room GB217

Sep
29
Thu
Distinguished Lecture with Prof. Derek Elsworth – Understanding Triggered Seismicity and Permeability Evolution in the Subsurface – Key Needs in Pursuit of the Energy Transition
Sep 29 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

 

LOCATION – TBD

REGISTRATION AVAILABLE
(Lecture hall information will be sent out via email the morning of the event)

 

The Department of Civil & Mineral Engineering
Distinguished Lecture Series

Presents

Professor Derek Elsworth
Energy and Mineral Engineering & Geosciences, G3 Center and EMS Energy Institute
Pennsylvania State University, University Park, USA

Understanding Triggered Seismicity and Permeability Evolution in the Subsurface
– Key Needs in Pursuit of the Energy Transition

 

 

Abstract

Contemporary methods of energy conversion that reduce carbon intensity and address the energy transition draw heavily on fluids in the subsurface. This includes sequestering CO2, fuel switching to lower-carbon sources, such as from abundant gas shales, recovering deep geothermal energy via EGS, and diurnal and inter-seasonal storage of heat, H2 and energized fluids (CAES). In all of these endeavors, either maintaining the low permeability and integrity of caprocks or in controlling the growth of permeability in initially very-low-permeability shales or geothermal reservoirs represent key desires. Injected volumes are necessarily enormous, anticipated overpressures large and the potential for hazardous triggered seismicity significant. We explore conditions controlling the linked evolution of seismicity and permeability in particular with respect to the (i) scaling of seismicity, (ii) controls on permeability evolution and the (iii) potential to recover permeability evolution from physics-based models of microearthquakes linked to permeability evolution.

 

 

Biosketch

Derek Elsworth is G. Albert Shoemaker Chair and Professor of Energy and Mineral Engineering and Geosciences at Penn State. He is co-founder of the Center for Geomechanics, Geofluids, and Geohazards. His interests are in the areas of computational mechanics, rock mechanics, and in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rocks, with application to geothermal energy, the deep geological sequestration of radioactive wastes and of CO2, unconventional hydrocarbons including coal-gas, tight-gas-shales and hydrates, and instability and eruption dynamics of volcanoes.

 

http://www.ems.psu.edu/~elsworth/

Oct
10
Mon
Thanksgiving (UNIVERSITY CLOSED)
Oct 10 all-day
Oct
27
Thu
Distinguished Lecture Series with Prof. Paul Westerhoff
Oct 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

The Department of Civil & Mineral Engineering’s
Distinguished Lecture Series presents:

Prof. Paul Westerhoff
Regents Professor
Fulton Chair of Environmental Engineering
Arizona State University

FREE TO ATTEND
Location TBD

Registration available
(room information will be emailed out the morning of the talk)

Title: 
Broad Utilization of the Electromagnetic Spectrum To Enable Nanotechnology to Treat Drinking Water

Abstract:
Clean water is critical for drinking, industrial processes, and aquatic organisms. Existing water treatment and infrastructure are chemically-intensive and based on nearly century-old technologies that fail to meet modern large and decentralized communities. The next-generation of water processes can transition from outdated technologies by utilizing nanomaterials to harness energy from across the electromagnetic spectrum, enabling electrified and solar-based technologies. The last decade was marked by tremendous improvements in nanomaterial design, synthesis, characterization, and assessment of material properties. This presentation will cover a range of applications utilizing the electromagnetic spectrum, but focus on specific scientific breakthroughs in using nanomaterial coated optical fibers to enable chemical-free water treatment.  Realizing the benefits of these advances requires placing greater attention on embedding nanomaterials onto and into surfaces within reactors and applying external energy sources. This will allow nanomaterial-based processes to replace Victorian-aged, chemical intensive water treatment


BIO
Dr. Paul Westerhoff is a Regents Professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University and the Fulton Chair of Environmental Engineering. He joined ASU in 1995 and after serving as the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Chair he was the Founding Director for the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment. Since then he has served as an Associate Dean of Research in Engineering, ASU Vice Provost for Academic Programming, and Vice Dean for Research and Innovation in Engineering.

He is the Deputy Director of a National Science Foundation Nanosystems Engineering Research Center  for Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (newtcenter.org)  and co-Deputy Director of the NSF Science and Technologies for Phosphorus Sustainability Center (steps-center.org).  He has over 350 journal publications (H-index>100)  and multiple patents on his research related to fate of nanomaterials in water, developing novel technologies for water and reuse treatment, and understanding reactions related to the fate of pollutants during treatment or in natural systems with a focus on oxo-anions, natural organic matter and micropollutants. He is the recipient of several awards including the recipient of the 2020 A.P. Black award from the American Water Works Association, 2019 NWRI Clarke Prize for excellence in the fields of water science and technology,  2017 Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization Annual Achievement Award, ASU Outstanding Doctoral Mentor for 2015, 2013 ARCADIS/AEESP Frontier in Research Award, and 2006 Paul L. Busch Award.

Nov
7
Mon
Engineering Study Week
Nov 7 – Nov 11 all-day
Jan
11
Wed
CivMin’s Prof. Daeho Kim – Skule™ Lunch & Learn
Jan 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

SAVE THE DATE
more info to come

Skule™ Lunch & Learn Series 2022 – 2023
Wednesday, January 11, 2023

Guest speaker:
Professor Daeho Kim
Department of Civil & Mineral Engineering
University of Toronto

© 2022 Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering