Calendar

Jan
27
Thu
2022
Distinguished Lecture with Prof. Derek Elsworth
Jan 27 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
  • EXACT TIMING – TBD
  • LOCATION – TBD

The Department of Civil & Mineral Engineering
Distinguished Lecture Series

Presents

Professor Derek Elsworth

Penn State

 

REGISTRATION AVAILABLE CLOSER TO DATE
(Lecture hall and/or Zoom link will be sent out via email the morning of the event)

Mar
1
Tue
2022
Distinguished Lecture with Prof. Nora El-Gohary
Mar 1 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
  • EXACT TIMING – TBD
  • LOCATION – TBD

The Department of Civil & Mineral Engineering
Distinguished Lecture Series

Presents

Professor Nora El-Gohary

University of Illinois

 

Mar
31
Thu
2022
Distinguished Lecture with Prof. Paul Westerhoff: Broad Utilization of the Electromagnetic Spectrum To Enable Nanotechnology to Treat Drinking Water
Mar 31 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

The Department of Civil & Mineral Engineering
Distinguished Lecture Series

Presents

Professor Paul Westerhoff

Arizona State University
Deputy Director, NSF-ERC for Nanotechnology-Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT)
Co-Deputy Director, NSF Science and Technologies for Phosphorus Sustainability (STEPS) Center
Executive Editor of Environmental Science and Technology
Distinguished Global Futures Scientist
PLuS Alliance Fellow
Regents’ Professor
Fulton Chair of Environmental Engineering
School of Sustainable Engineering and The Built Environment
Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering

Broad Utilization of the Electromagnetic Spectrum
To Enable Nanotechnology to Treat Drinking Water

LOCATION TBD
(depending upon public health guidelines and University policy)

Thursday, March 31 at 2 p.m.ET 

REGISTRATION AVAILABLE CLOSER TO DATE
(Lecture hall and/or Zoom link will be sent out via email the morning of the event)

 

Abstract:
Clean water is critical for drinking, industrial processes, and aquatic organisms. Existing water treatment and infrastructure are chemically-intensive and based on nearly century-old technologies that fail to meet modern large and decentralized communities. The next-generation of water processes can transition from outdated technologies by utilizing nanomaterials to harness energy from across the electromagnetic spectrum, enabling electrified and solar-based technologies. The last decade was marked by tremendous improvements in nanomaterial design, synthesis, characterization, and assessment of material properties. This presentation will cover a range of applications utilizing the electromagnetic spectrum, but focus on specific scientific breakthroughs in using nanomaterial coated optical fibers to enable chemical-free water treatment.  Realizing the benefits of these advances requires placing greater attention on embedding nanomaterials onto and into surfaces within reactors and applying external energy sources. This will allow nanomaterial-based processes to replace Victorian-aged, chemical intensive water treatment technologies.

 

Bio:

Dr. Paul Westerhoff is a Regents Professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University and the Fulton Chair of Environmental Engineering. He joined ASU in 1995 and after serving as the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Chair he was the Founding Director for the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment. Since then he has served as an Associate Dean of Research in Engineering, ASU Vice Provost for Academic Programming, and Vice Dean for Research and Innovation in Engineering.

 

He is the Deputy Director of a National Science Foundation Nanosystems Engineering Research Center  for Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (newtcenter.org) and co-Deputy Director of the NSF Science and Technologies for Phosphorus Sustainability Center (steps-center.org).  He has over 350 journal publications (H-index>100) and multiple patents on his research related to fate of nanomaterials in water, developing novel technologies for water and reuse treatment, and understanding reactions related to the fate of pollutants during treatment or in natural systems with a focus on oxo-anions, natural organic matter and micropollutants. He is the recipient of several awards including the recipient of the 2020 A.P. Black award from the American Water Works Association, 2019 NWRI Clarke Prize for excellence in the fields of water science and technology,  2017 Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization Annual Achievement Award, ASU Outstanding Doctoral Mentor for 2015, 2013 ARCADIS/AEESP Frontier in Research Award, and 2006 Paul L. Busch Award.

 

 

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