Graduate Course Catalogue

CEM1001H
The Challenges of Urban Policymaking
Professor Shoshannah Saxe

Addressing societal and engineering challenges in the 21st century requires engineers to think holistically about the systems we design and build. Public policy often dictates what engineering projects are commissioned and what values are being optimized for in engineering practice (e.g. cost, beauty, environment, safety, equity). However, too few engineers understand the drivers of public policy, how public policy is developed, and the role it plays in engineering. Similarly, too few policy makers understand the applied science of engineering. The interplay between policy and civil engineering is particularly acute in the urban environment, where civil engineering works (transportation, housing, water services, libraries, etc.) are concentrated and where, in Canada, the public policies of three levels of government influence engineering practice.

This seminar course challenges engineers to think about how public policy is made and how it guides the practice of engineering both directly and indirectly. Particular focus is placed on urban policy and urban engineering. The first month of the course will deal with the process of urban policy making examining how issues emerge, how important ideas are framed, priorities are established, and agendas are set and managed. Factors to be considered include the role of bureaucratic and political actors, organized interests and non-governmental groups, the importance and influence of networks, and the potential for new models and options for the engagement of stakeholders and citizens at large.

The second and third month of the course will focus on the relationship between public policy and the practice of civil engineering. The focus of the course will be to examine the myriad ways public policy and priorities intersect with the development of the built environment. The relationship between public policy and engineering in housing, transport, energy and sustainability will be discussed. The focus of the course will be on Canadian cities with examples from cities located elsewhere in the high-income world; examples and experiences from other parts of the world are welcomed.

Registration in this course is reserved for MEngCEM students only.

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CEM1002H
Empirical Study of Cities
Professor Mark Fox

This course provides students with an introduction to the topic of cities, how they are measured, and the methods used to measure them. The strengths and limitations of various measures are examined including issues related the cost of collecting data and the challenges in ensuring its integrity. After reviewing the most commonly used statistical analysis methods, student will calculate and use metrics to compare cities in Canada, North America, and around the world. Metrics of interest include, but are not limited to, those related to city services, public health and well-being, environmental sustainability, and economic vitality.

Registration in this course is reserved for MEngCEM students. Other students wishing to register must request permission from the Office of Student Services.

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CEM1003H
Infrastructure & Urban Prosperity
Prof. Ayad Hammadi

The course explores the evolution of great cities over time, looking at form and function to understand urban economic growth and accumulation of wealth. Drawing from various strands of economic thought, topics include: value theory; quantification of urban wealth; microeconomics of real estate markets; infrastructure for competitive financial centres; macroeconomics of urban form; growth theory; and evolutionary economics applied to urban systems. Using current and historical examples of urban development, the implications of infrastructure planning and management on the health/wealth of cities is examined.

Registration in this course is reserved for MEngCEM students. Other students wishing to register must request permission from the Office of Student Services.

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CEM1004H
Cities As Complex Systems
Professor Eric Miller

Cities are problems in organized complexity (Jacobs, 1961). This course will explore this theme and its implications for city engineering and management in terms of: introduction to complex systems theory; exploration of cities as systems (physical, economic, social, etc.); holistic and reductionist approaches to 'a science of cities'; approaches to city planning and design in the face of complexity; challenges to sustainable design; and decision-making under uncertainty.

Registration in this course is reserved for MEngCEM students. Other students wishing to register must request permission from the Office of Student Services.

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CIV510H
Solid Mechanics II

This course provides a continuing study of the mechanics of deformable solids. Stress and equilibrium conditions, strain and compatibility conditions, stress-strain relations and yield/failure criteria are considered in the context of civil engineering materials. Two-and three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed, with an introduction to the use of tensor notation. Advanced topics in bending, shear and torsion of beams are also covered, as is elementary plate bending theory. The course concludes with a further development and application of energy methods including virtual work, potential energy, strain energy, and related approaches.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV514H
Concrete Technology
Prof. Karl Peterson

Material aspects of concrete production will be dealt with in the context of various performance criteria with emphasis on durability. The process of material selection, proportioning, mixing, transporting, placing and curing concrete will be the framework within which topics such as: the use of admixtures, choice of cements, environmental influences, methods of consolidation and testing techniques will be studied.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV515H
Introduction To Structure Dynamics
Prof. Oya Mercan

The concept of dynamic equilibrium and corresponding equation of motion will be introduced. The theoretical solution of a songle degree of freedom system will be derived and the effects of various types of loads, such as impulse load, sinusoidal load, or random vibration on the structural response will be discussed. To solve dynamic problems of multi-degree of freedom (MDOF) systems, concepts of mass, stiffness, and damping matrix will be introduced, which will be followed by eigen value analysis and modal analysis. The concepts of Fourier Transformation will be introduced, which will be used to interpret dynamic responses of structures or dynamic nature of applied loads. Dynamic experiments of elastic systems will be demonstrated using an educational shaking table.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV516H
Public Transit Operations and Planning

This course covers a broad range of topics in urban transit operations and planning, with special emphasis on best-practice strategies of modern transit systems. The course will help students: Learn the history of transit and its relationship to urban development, emerging challenges, transit role in society, and new trends and issues; Understand and analyze the factors that affect transit performance and demand; Identify and analyze transit operational and planning problems; Identify possible solutions at the operational level (mostly short-term and line-based) and the strategic level (mostly long-term and network-based), and assess alternative solutions; Understand the relative performance of various transit modes (both conventional and new modes) and their domains of application; and gain knowledge of best-practice transit systems planning and emerging innovations.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV517H
Prestressed Concrete
Prof. Michael Collins

An introduction to procedures for predicting the load-deformation response of prestressed concrete elements and structures with emphasis on how these procedures can be used in the design of new structures and in the evaluation of existing structures. Topics include: prestressing technology; control of cracking; response to axial load and flexure; response to shear and torsion; disturbed regions; restraint of deformations; design codes.

Prerequisite: CIV313H1 or CIV357H1 or equivalent.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV518H
Behaviour and Design of Steel Structures

The behaviour and design of trusses, frames, members and connections in steel building and bridge structures is presented and design methods are developed. Ultimate strength, stability, and postbuckling are emphasized in topical examples including: plate girders, composite steel/concrete girders, second-order frame behaviour, high-strength bolted and welded framing connections. Design applications considering metal fatigue and brittle fracture, and methods of plastic analysis are also introduced. Canadian design standards and the Limit States Design concepts are used.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV519H
Structural Analysis II

The general flexibility and stiffness methods of analysis; multispan beams, trusses, frames and grids; loadings due to force, support displacement, temperature change and member prestrain; axial and flexural stability; basic plasticity. Topics in this course represent the basis for the finite element method of analysis.

Prerequisite: CIV214H1.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV521H
Rock Mechanics
Prof. Kaiwen Xia

This course provides general analytical tools and experimental methods that are used in rock mechanics. The lectures are complemented with laboratory experiments. Theoretical topics include: stress and strain, linear elasticity, failure modes and models of rocks, fracture of rocks, inelastic behavior of rock, seismic waves in rocks. Experiments include: preparation of rock samples, uniaxial compressive strength measurements, Brazilian disc tests for rock tensile strength, fracture toughness measurements with core-based rock samples.

Prerequisite: CIV210H1/CME210H1

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV523H
Geotechnical Design
Prof. Kaiwen Xia

This course is built around a transportation project that contains all the essential geotechnical investigation and design elements and illustrates how they all come together on a project. The students will be taken through the entire design process from project initiation to construction. In essence, the project will include a bridge over a river with some property constraints requiring the use of a retaining wall as well as deep and shallow foundations and some groundwater control. The highway will require a soil cut. One section crosses a low-lying swampy area that will require embankment construction over deep soft soils. A short tunnel section is planned beneath a railway that cannot be taken out of service. A pavement design will be required along the entire route as well as materials testing and construction monitoring.

Prerequisite: CIV321H1/CME321H1; equivalent or permission of instructor.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV531H
Transport Planning
Prof. Khandker Nurul Habib

This course is intended to provide the student with the following: the ability to design and execute an urban transportation planning study; a working knowledge of transportation planning analysis skills including introductions to travel demand modelling, analysis of environmental impacts, modelling transportation - land use interactions and transportation project evaluation; an understanding of current transportation planning issues and policies; and an understanding of the overall process of transportation planning and its role within the wider context of transportation decision-making and the planning and design of urban areas. Person-based travel in urban regions is the focus of this course, but a brief introduction to freight and intercity passenger transportation is also provided. A “systems” approach to transportation planning and analysis is introduced and maintained throughout the course. Emphasis is placed throughout on designing transportation systems for long-run environmental, social, and economic sustainability.

Prerequisite: CIV368H1 / CME368H1.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV536H
Urban Activity, Air Pollution and Health

This is an interdisciplinary course where the challenge of air pollution is introduced with a focus on urban areas. The interdependencies between transportation, air quality, and health are demonstrated. The city and the behaviour of its inhabitants constitute the context for the following course topics: overview of air pollutants in urban areas, urban air quality monitoring networks, mobile source emissions, air pollution and meteorology, atmospheric dispersion, chemical processes specific to cities, personal mobility and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, epidemiology of air pollution.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV541H
Environmental Biotechnology
Prof. Elodie Passeport

Principles involved in the design and operation of biologically-based treatment facilities are covered with considerations for energy efficiency and sustainability. The course includes water / wastewater biological unit operations, advanced treatment, sludge processing and composting, natural treatment systems and specialized bioengineered systems such as groundwater remediation and biological air treatment.

Prerequisite: CIV342H1 or equivalent.

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CIV549H
Groundwater Flow and Contamination
Prof. Brent Sleep

Mechanics of saturated and unsaturated fluid flow in porous media. Confined and unconfined flow. Flow to wells. Analytical and numerical solutions of groundwater flow equations. Non-reactive and reactive contaminant transport on groundwater systems. Analytical and numerical solutions of contaminant transport equations. Flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. Assessment of environmental impacts of waste disposal operations. Remediation of contaminated groundwater.

Prerequisite: JVM270H1/CIV270H1/CME270H1, CIV250H1/EDV250H1 or equivalent.

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CIV550H
Water Resources Engineering

Global and national water problems, law and legislation. Hydraulic structures. Reservoir analysis. Urban drainage and runoff control: meteorologic data analysis, deterministic and stochastic modelling techniques. Flood control: structural and nonstructural alternatives. Power generation: hydro and thermal power generation. Low flow augmentation. Economics and decision making.

Prerequisite: CIV250H1/EDV250H1, CIV340H1 S or equivalent.

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CIV575H
Studies in Building Science
Prof. Marianne Touchie

This course examines the basic principles governing the control of heat, moisture and air movement in buildings and presents the fundamentals of building enclosure design. With this background, students are required to research advanced topics related to emerging areas of Building Science, and to write and present to the class an individual comprehensive paper related to their research. Lectures for this course will be jointly offered with those of CIV375H1.

Exclusion: CIV375H1.

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CIV576H
Sustainable Buildings
Prof. Marianne Touchie

Building systems including the thermal envelope, heating and cooling systems, as well as water and lighting systems are examined with a view to reducing the net energy consumed within the building. Life-cycle economic and assessment methods are applied to the evaluation of various design options including considerations of embodied energy and carbon sequestration. Green building strategies including natural ventilation, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar water heaters, green roofs and geothermal energy piles are introduced. Following the application of these methods, students are introduced to efficient designs including LEED designs that lessen the impact of buildings on the environment. Exemplary building designs will be presented and analyzed.

Prerequisite: CIV375H1/CIV575H1 or equivalent.

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CIV577H
Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities

Developing infrastructure for sustainable cities entails understanding the connection between urban morphology and physiology. This course uses a systems approach to analyzing anthropogenic material flow and other components of urban metabolism, linking them to the design of urban infrastructure. Elements of sustainable transportation, green buildings, urban climatology, urban vegetation, water systems and local energy supply are integrated in the design of sustainable urban neighbourhoods.

Prerequisite: CIV340H1, [CIV375H1/CIV575H1], CIV531H1.

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CIV578H
Design of Building Enclosures
Bomani Ajamu Khemet

A brief summary of the science involved in controlling heat, moisture and air movement in buildings is presented at the outset of the course. With this background, methods of designing enclosures for cold, mixed, and hot climates are examined. Design principles related to the design of walls, windows and roofs are presented and applied. In particular, topics related to the control of rain penetration, air movement, and interstitial condensation are studied in detail. Emphasis is placed on developing designs based on fundamentals which can be verified with computer modelling solutions.

Prerequisite: CIV375/CIV575 or equivalent.

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CIV580H
Engineering and Management of Large Projects
Prof. Daniel Posen

This technical elective course will investigate the role of stakeholders in major civil engineering projects; the complexities of managing project stages, multiple stakeholders, and technical challenges, and, social and environmental factors.

Each week includes a different speaker who can address issues related to technical, social, and environmental challenges in the project and how they were overcome.

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CIV1163H
Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete
Prof. Frank Vecchio

Theories of elasticity and plasticity, as applied to reinforced concrete, are examined. Topics include: mechanical properties of concrete and reinforcement; constitutive relations; failure criteria; linear-elastic models; nonlinear-elastic models; elastic-plastic models; limit analysis theorems; and an introduction to fracture mechanics of concrete. Compression field and smeared crack models are discussed, as are methods of their implementation and application in nonlinear finite element analyses.

Prerequisites: CIV313H1, CIV510H1.

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CIV1164H
Bridge Engineering
Prof. Paul Gauvreau

This course deals with advanced topics in modern bridge design. Actual course content will vary from year to year, and will include topics selected from the following list: concrete segmental bridges, cable-supported bridges, arches, precast concrete systems for rehabilitation of existing bridges, and innovative composite systems. For a given topic, the approach taken will be to define performance requirements; describe structural systems, components, and critical details; and develop analytical methods for dimensioning and validation, giving special consideration to the interaction between design and construction. There will be a strong emphasis throughout the course on the application of leading-edge and emerging technologies, including high-performance materials.

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CIV1167H
Advanced Structural Dynamics
Prof. Oya Mercan

This course provides the basic principles of system identification and structural control. In order to bridge the gap that the civil engineering students have with regards to the interdisciplinary aspects of CIV1167H, principles of signals, sensors, data acquisition and filtering, complex plane representation of system dynamics, and relationship between different transformation for information mapping between time and frequency domains, and processing of random signals are covered in detail. Analytical and experimental modal analysis topics are included, which not only provide the students with a system identification tool but also enable them to handle the dynamics of complex structures with non-proportional damping.

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CIV1169H
Advanced Topics in Building Design
Prof. Shamim Sheikh

Introduction to various structural systems; analysis of coupled shear walls using various techniques such as Laminar method, Finite difference formulation, Equivalent Frame method; stagewise incremental analysis of walls including plastification of laminae; design of walls and coupling beams; shear wall-frame interaction; behaviour of framed tubes; shear lag in tubes; approximate methods of analysis for frame tubes and multi-storey frames. Individual projects involving specialized topics will form an integral part of the course.

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CIV1171H
Principles of Earthquake Engineering and Seismic Design
Prof. Constantin Christopoulos

The objectives of the course are to acquaint graduate students and practicing engineers with the basics of earthquake engineering and seismic resistant design of structures. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be able to interact with seismologists and understand the fundamentals behind seismic hazard maps contained in our codes, apply basic dynamics principles to seismic design, understand the seismic design philosophy that is implemented in all codes and apply the main steps that are involved in the seismic design of buildings made of steel or reinforced concrete. Special emphasis will be given to the real behaviour of structures under seismic loading, more specifically the formation of ductile mechanisms, and the assessment of performance under different intensities of seismic input. Common pitfalls in seismic design will be extensively discussed, and the underlying assumptions and code requirements related to the detailing of a number of RC and steel lateral load resisting systems will be presented. Pre-requisite: CIV515 or an equivalent course.

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CIV1174H
Finite Element Methods in Structural Mechanics
Prof. Evan Bentz

Review of required mathematical concepts. Thorough development of the displacement method of finite element analysis; Derivation of the element matrices for planes stress and strain, three dimensional, axisymmetric and plate bending elements; Introduction to nonlinear analysis; Application to structures using existing computer capabilities.

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CIV1175H
Design of Tubular Steel Structures
Prof. Jeffrey Packer

This course covers contemporary structural design with an extremely popular material ­tubular steel. An overview of international specifications and design guides is given and "state­-of-the-art" limit states design procedures are presented, discussed and illustrated with worked examples. Offshore structures are given some treatment but the course concentrates on onshore structures made from manufactured tubing or Hollow Structural Sections (HSS). Specific topics deal with: materials, testing and properties; columns and poles; concrete filling; fire protection; fabrication, including bolting, welding and nailing; plastic analysis of connections; welded tube- to-tube connections; braced frames and bracing design; bolted connections; finite element analysis of tubular structures; truss design for 2D triangulated or Vierendeel trusses; 3D space frames; moment-resisting frames and connections; and fatigue of connections.

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CIV1190H
Structures Under Blast and Impact
Adj. Prof. Michael Seica

The behaviour of structures subjected to accidental or intentional blast or impact loading is exemplified beginning from understanding the nature of threats and blast loading evaluation, to dynamic analysis and specific structural design considerations. Topics presented include:

1. Threat and risk assessment;
2. Explosive processes. Detonation and deflagration;
3. Explosion effects. Loads on structures;
4. Dynamic analysis of structures;
5. Material behaviour under high-strain rate loading;
6. Design of reinforced concrete structures;
7. Design of steel structures;
8. Behaviour of glazing systems;
9. Pressure-impulse diagrams;
10. Industrial explosions;
11. Design for impact loading; and
12. Progressive collapse.

The course addresses the existing lack of expertise in the area of extreme loading on structures and resilience of critical infrastructure, at a time when the need for knowledge in protective design is continuously increasing worldwide. At the forefront of engineering science, the course is unique in Canada and enhances the area of Structural Engineering, in general, and Physical Infrastructure Protection, in particular.

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CIV1199H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Design of Timber Structures
Prof. Paul Gauvreau

Special studies courses are offered when a Professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1199H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Structural Health Monitoring
Prof. Fae Azhari

Special studies courses are offered when a Professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1201H
Concrete Technology and Non-Destructive Testing Principles
Prof. Daman Panesar

This course is focused on theory, principle, practical application, standardization, benefits, and limitations of non-destructive testing (NDT) methods applied to steel reinforced concrete. Techniques to be covered include: condition assessment, surface hardness, penetration resistance, pullout, break-off test, maturity method, pull-off permeability, resonant frequency, UPV, magnetic/electrical, radioactive/nuclear, short pulse radar, acoustic emission, infrared thermography. A review of the role of statistics in experiments, testing and design of experiments in addition to application of significance testing, linear regression analysis and assessment of adequacy of regression models in context with non-destructive techniques will be covered. This course will also include the study of practical case studies and hands on usage of selected NDT testing equipment.

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CIV1240H
Building Performance Assessment
Prof. Marianne Touchie

It is well known that significant performance gaps exist between the building design stage and building operation. To ensure buildings achieve predicted performance in terms of resource use and occupant comfort, health and wellbeing, post-occupancy performance assessment is required. This course begins by introducing students to common building performance issues, the existing frameworks and rating systems designed to characterize these issues as well as the three performance gap types: prediction, expectation and outcomes. Next, the relationship between occupants, the building envelope and mechanical systems is explored, including the influence of each of these elements on indoor environmental quality and resource use. Through a field study in an occupied building, students will gain experience with the metrics, measurement methods and data analysis techniques used in the holistic assessment of building performance.

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CIV1250H
Instrumentation Techniques for Cement and Concrete Researchers
Prof. Douglas Hooton

The study of Concrete Technology makes use of many test methods not normally associated with Civil Engineering. Methods include those for pore structure and surface area by BET; mercury porosimetry; permeability to vapour, gas and liquids; mineralogy by optical microscopy x-ray diffraction and thermal analysis; microstructure by optical and electron microscope; and chemical analysis by XRF, AA, IR, IC or neutron activation. Published literature will be discussed with respect to differences in such procedures, and interpretation of data.

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CIV1252H
Infrastructure Renewal
Prof. Hannah Schell

This course deals with the assessment maintenance and repair of concrete structures. Topics covered include: inspection and monitoring of concrete structures (including instrumentation and non-destructive testing); identification of material failure mechanisms; residual service life prediction; life cycle cost analysis; and methods of repair and rehabilitation. Case studies of problems in structures due to reinforcement corrosion, alkali-aggregate reaction and free-thaw cycling will be investigated in detail. Recent advances in inspection and repair techniques will be critically evaluated.

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CIV1260H
Chemistry of Cements and Concrete
Prof. Doug Hooton

Prerequisite: CIV 514H

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CIV1262H
Microscopy Applied to Building and Geomaterials
Prof. Karl Peterson

This laboratory course covers visible light, electron, and x-ray microscopic methods for the characterization of concrete and geo-materials, including methods of sample preparation. Topics include fluorescent dye impregnation to characterize cracks/grain boundaries/pores, chemical staining procedures, image and quantitative chemical analysis using free software packages (ImageJ, MultiSpec, and DTSA-II). After taking this course students will be able to take a geologic or concrete sample through the entire process of stabilization, preparation (cutting, grinding, polishing) and examination by microscopic methods.

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CIV1275H
Construction Modelling Methods
Prof. Brenda McCabe

Course Objectives In this course, students will learn ways in which data can be modeled in the application of construction management: probabilistic and process.
Probabilistic models (Bayesian Networks) – students will learn about BNs, understand the way in which they model data, their strengths and shortcomings, and their application in a construction context. Students will be expected to use MSBNx software (freely available)

Simulation modeling – students will learn how discrete event simulation engines work. They will learn to build a model for a construction operation, understand their strengths and shortcomings, and process input and output data.

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CIV1279H
Construction Contract Documents||
Instructor Jiwan Thapar

This course examines various construction contract documents used by government and private bodies. Legal principles and relevant cases are discussed with a view to providing students with an understanding of the legal framework surrounding the documents. Contractual problems including the nature, causes, and quantification of construction claims are also examined. Emphasis is placed on how to avoid construction contract problems, as well as how disputes may be efficiently resolved once they arise. Issues of payment security, bankruptcy, liens and professional liability are also studied.

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CIV1281H
Asset Management: Frameworks and Processes

Prof. Tamer El-Diraby

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CIV1289H
The Business of Knowledge in Civil Engineering
Prof. Tamer El-Diraby

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CIV1298H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering: Building Information Modelling
Jinyue Zhang

The course is designed to provide students with both hands-on experiences on BIM applications and research exposure to advanced BIM topics. It introduces the basic principles of BIM in most application areas including design, construction, facility management, and sustainability. Hands-on skills required for generating building information models are covered through the use of popular BIM tools. Current research topics and trends of BIM are explored to understand better their impacts to the future of the AEC industry.
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Special studies courses are offered when a Professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1298H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering: The Business of Selling Civil Engineering Knowledge
Prof. Tamer El-Diraby

Special studies courses are offered when a Professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1298H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering: Indoor Air Quality - Moisture, Microbes and Materials

We spend most of our time indoors exposed to a variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Accounting for and minimizing potentially harmful exposures is critical to indoor air quality. Through this course, students will gain new knowledge in the field of indoor air quality and develop skills to engineer solutions to create healthy, sustainable and equitable indoor environments. Focus will be given to moisture transport through materials, water activity, the impact of moisture on organic indoor contaminants such as bioaerosols, and methodologies to prevent, remediate and monitor indoor mould growth. Further, this course will investigate tools, such as next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics, used to characterize indoor microbiomes and bioaerosols. Interest will also be given to issues in indoor environmental quality specifically in Indigenous housing as well as low-socioeconomic communities in Canada. Through a course project, students will engineer a solution using resources and skills developed throughout the course for a particular issue of interest in indoor air quality.

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CIV1299H
Building Energy Performance Simulation
Prof. Seungjae Lee

Building performance simulation (BPS) is the process of imitating/predicting aspects of building performance with computational building models. The models draw heavily upon the disciplines of heat and mass transfer, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, light transmission, and occupant behaviour. BPS allows improving the design and operation of buildings through quantitative analyses. This course will provide students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills to effectively apply BPS tools in design and analysis contexts focusing on building heating and cooling loads, building energy systems, and whole-building energy performance
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Special studies courses are offered when a Professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

View full course description in the Engineering Undergrad Academic Calendar.

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CIV1299H
New Topics In Civil & Mineral Engineering: Asset Management: Quantitative tools and methods
Hesham Osman

This course presents a number of quantitative tools and analytical methods for the asset manager. Topics covered include data modelling and management, stochastic and deterministic models for asset deterioration, models for optimal asset repair/replacement decisions, tools for asset risk assessment, multi-criteria decision-making models in the context of asset management problems, and infrastructure resiliency and adaptation for climate change. Two guest lecturers will be invited to present current practices and emerging trends. A course project will involve the application of tools and methods presented in class on actual infrastructure data sets.
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Special studies courses are offered when a Professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1299H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Introduction To Corrosion
Ibrahim Ogunsanya

The Civil industry, like many other engineering industries, has been plagued with corrosion degradation problems. In 2016, the National Association of Corrosion Engineers estimated US$2.5 trillion, which is ~ 3.4% of the global Gross Domestic Product (GDP), as the annual global cost of corrosion. In Canada, the annual estimated direct corrosion cost of corrosion across all sectors is US$46.4 billion, ~2.5% of Canada’s GDP. Therefore, we need to establish cost-effective control strategies underpinned by a sound fundamental understanding of corrosion mechanisms on different metal alloys to reduce the enormous cost of corrosion and aid the sustainable development of new structures. Students will be exposed to corrosion problems in different engineering sectors. We will look at electrochemical reactions; mechanisms and kinetics/rates of corrosion; modes of corrosive attack including stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement; corrosion mitigation and prevention through proper materials selection, design, cathodic and anodic protection, and coatings to increase the structure’s service life; and overall discussion on technologically important material-environment combinations.

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CIV1299H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering: Virtualization & Analytics in Construction
Prof. Tamer El-Diraby

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CIV1299H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering: Introduction to Construction Claims
Prof. Jiwan Thapar

This course is designed for students and professionals in the construction industry looking to advance their understanding of construction claims. The course will provide attendees with techniques to manage the unique contractual challenges that come from different construction project delivery methods and which could lead to cost intensive disputes)

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CIV1302H
Low Impact Development and Stormwater Systems
Prof. Jennifer Drake

Civil Engineering is the oldest branch of engineering. In ancient times, architects, engineers and planners were one and the same. In landscape design, these three disciplines are still closely linked particularly in the design and construction of green infrastructure, low impact develop and stormwater infrastructure. In this course the design of stormwater management systems will be taught with a multi-disciplinary approach. Impacts to the flow regime, water balances, flow paths, water quality and aquatic habitats will be discussed. The low impact development (LID) design approach will be examined as a tool for sustainable urban planning. Some topics covered in this course include:
• Conventional systems (stormwater management ponds)
• Vegetated stormwater systems (green roofs, bioretention)
• Infiltration systems (permeable pavements, exfiltration cells
• Treatment systems (oil-grit separators, filter strips)
• Modelling approaches.
• Sediment and erosion control and operational considerations.

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CIV1303H
Water Resources Systems Modelling
Prof. Bryan Karney

Water resources systems are physically complex and the solution of appropriate mathematical models is computationally demanding. This course considers physical processes in water resource systems, their mathematical representation and numerical solutions. Newton's 2nd law and the equations of mass and energy conservation are developed and applied to closed-conduit, open-channel and groundwater flow problems. Procedures for efficient numerical solution of the governing equations are presented. Problems of non-linearity, sensitivity to data and computational complexity are introduced.

Prerequisite: EDV250H1 or permission of the instructor.

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CIV1307H
Life Cycle Assessment and Sustainability of Engineering Activities
Alexandre Milovanoff

Engineers face growing pressure to incorporate sustainability objectives into their practice. In comparing two products/designs it is often not apparent which one is more sustainable. The course introduces concepts and methods for sustainability assessment. The course primarily focuses on Life Cycle Assessment as it is viewed as being a necessary component of any assessment. This is a research based course and is suitable for students interested in researching in depth a particular topic. By the end of the course, students will have an awareness of analytical tools/resources for evaluating sustainability implications employing a systems perspective, and have applied these tools in a research project. This course assumes students have a background in engineering and have taken a course in engineering economics. 2 lecture hours per week.

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CIV1308H
Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes
Alexandre Milovanoff

Theory and application of physical and chemical operations and processes for the treatment of water and wastewater. Specific processes covered include sedimentation, coagulation, filtration, and disinfection, with an overview of reactor theory. Laboratory experiments are designed to support and demonstrate the lecture material.

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CIV1309H
Biological Treatment Processes
Prof. Susan Andrews

Theory and application of physical and chemical operations and processes for the treatment of water and wastewater. Specific processes covered include sedimentation, coagulation, filtration, and disinfection, with an overview of reactor theory. Laboratory experiments are designed to support and demonstrate the lecture material.

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CIV1311H
Advanced and Sustainable Drinking Water Treatment
Prof. Bob Andrews

*enrollment preference will be given to students in the Advanced Water Technologies & Process Design specialization, and the Drinking Water Research Group.*

This course covers sustainability issues as they apply to the provision of safe drinking water. Water reclamation and reuse topics focus on strategies that allow wastewater to be treated for indirect potable reuse as well as many other purposes. Other major topics include: risk assessment associated with emerging pathogens and chemical constituents present in source waters, advanced drinking water treatment processes including membranes (UF, NF and RO), advanced oxidation and activated carbon. Throughout the course, case studies, application examples and numerical problems will be presented.

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CIV1319H
Chemistry and Analysis of Water and Wastes
Prof. Susan Andrews

This course deals with the major chemical processes occurring in aqueous environments, in both natural systems and treatment systems. The topics covered include: chemical thermodynamics and kinetics; acid/base chemistry; quantitative equilibrium calculations; acid-base titrations; dissolved CO2 chemistry; mineral solution chemistry; complexation; redox reactions; and the solid-solution interface. The lectures are complemented by laboratory experiments in which students learn some of the standard analysis techniques of aquatic chemistry.

*Note: priority is given to CIV/MIN research-stream students and M.Eng. students who require this course to complete a technical emphasis

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CIV1319H
Chemistry and Analysis of Water and Wastes
Prof. Susan Andrews

This course deals with the major chemical processes occurring in aqueous environments, in both natural systems and treatment systems. The topics covered include: chemical thermodynamics and kinetics; acid/base chemistry; quantitative equilibrium calculations; acid-base titrations; dissolved CO2 chemistry; mineral solution chemistry; complexation; redox reactions; and the solid-solution interface. The lectures are complemented by laboratory experiments in which students learn some of the standard analysis techniques of aquatic chemistry.

*Note: priority is given to CIV/MIN research-stream students and M.Eng. students who require this course to complete a technical emphasis

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CIV1320H
Indoor Air Quality
Prof. Jeffrey Siegel

Contaminants in indoor air have enormous impact on human health, productivity, building energy use and sustainability. This course focuses on important contaminants, fundamental tools and methodologies to measure and model the indoor environment, and on engineering solutions to improve indoor air quality. The course covers a rationale and motivation for the investigation of indoor contaminants, important contaminants and sources, the use of mass balances to assess indoor concentrations, fundamental transport and transformation processes that occur indoors, indoor exposure assessment, and methodologies to assess costs and benefits for technologies and techniques to improve indoor air. The course explicitly links the air inside of buildings to building materials, energy use, outdoor air quality, and human health.

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CIV1321H
Large Scale Infrastructure and Sustainability
Prof. Shoshanna Saxe

The next 15 years will see major changes in the global infrastructure system. To meet local, national and international sustainability goals, this next generation of infrastructure must be planned, designed and built in new ways. Large scale infrastructure projects have impacts well beyond their stated primary purpose: they consume significant amounts of natural resources and, once built, change how we live, work and move. As key players in planning, designing, constructing and commissioning large infrastructure projects, engineers have a special responsibility to understand the myriad ways infrastructure interacts with our natural and social systems. This course will explore what sustainability means in the context of infrastructure development, examine infrastructure needs and sustainability at the global and project scale, and provide students with skills and techniques to have an impact on infrastructure sustainability in their future work. At the end of this course, students will be able to think critically about the wider impacts of large-scale infrastructure projects and use this knowledge alongside their technical engineering skills to develop better outcomes. Students will learn approaches and skills for analysing (and influencing) the sustainability of infrastructure systems at the project and system scale.

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CIV1322
Quantitative Methods for Decision-Making
Prof. Daniel Posen

This course introduces students to core principles and quantitative methods to provide support for making ‘hard’ decisions, and communicating results. Topics include structured decision-making techniques (e.g., decision trees), public sector decision making (e.g., benefit-cost analysis, welfare economics), multi-criteria decision-making, and decision making under uncertainty (e.g., sensitivity analysis, Monte Carlo simulation, utility theory and risk attitudes).

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CIV1330H
Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Global Health
Adj. Prof. Ray Cantwell

This course focuses on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in low-income settings from an engineering and environmental health perspective. With respect to water, the course will cover drinking water quality and quantity, water access, and appropriate water treatment and storage options. The course will cover aspects of sanitation promotion, sanitation in challenging environments, and fecal sludge management. Hygiene topics will include disease transmission, handwashing station design, and theory and practice of hygiene behaviour, education and behaviour change. Local and national governance in WASH will also be explored

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CIV1398H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Waterpower Essentials
Sharon Mandair

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CIV1398H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Changing Human Habits with sensors and Design
Prof. David Meyer (né Prof. David Taylor)

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CIV1399H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Climate change and implications for engineering systems
Monirul Mirza

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CIV1399H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Environmental Remediation with Passive Water Treatment Systems
Prof. Elodie Passeport

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CIV1399H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Strategies & Applications for Meeting Net Zero Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Ian Sinclair

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CIV1399HS1
Renewal of Waterpower Facilities
Michael Morgenroth

Infrastructure is both aging and being repurposed. This course looks at how the design of waterpower dams, structures and equipment has been shaped by technological change over time. Students will learn to analyze the upgrade potential of an existing plant; review the tools and data available to understand site condition and to be aware of modernization scope for structures and equipment in the context of environmental, social, technical and economic decision making.

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CIV1420H
Soil Properties and Behaviour
Prof. Murray Grabinsky

The fundamental concepts of soil mechanics and foundation engineering presented at the undergraduate level will be further developed in the context of advanced topics including: undrained loading and soil liquefaction; coupled hydro-mechanical modeling using Biot theory; cemented soils; unsaturated soil mechanics; constitutive models and laboratory test methods; and field monitoring techniques. Extensive reading assignments will be given. Research papers, numerical modeling assignments, and class presentations will be used as the basis for evaluation.

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CIV1422H
Dynamic Response of Engineering Materials

Fundamental theories and applications of response and failure of engineering materials (e.g. rocks, concretes, steels, polymers and glass) under highly dynamic loading. Topics include elastic and plastic stress wave propagation, failure and fracture theory under rapidly varying loads, dynamic fracture toughness, nucleation and propagation of damage in materials and their theoretical and experimental quantification.
Lectures will be supplemented by selected laboratory exercises involving the newly built state-of-the-art Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar facilities, to illustrate the physics of dynamic loading, strain-rate effects, and high velocity fracture in engineering materials

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CIV1429H
Advanced Rock Engineering: Fractured Rock Masses

Rock masses can be defined as made of intact rock blocks and discontinuities (joints, faults, etc…). It is the presence of those weak features that determine the overall hydro-mechanical response of the rock mass that engineers observe in the field. Therefore, to correctly engineer any structure in rock, we cannot relay only on the mechanical properties of the intact rock, but we need to be able to properly understand the role that fractures play on the overall behaviour that we observe, and how to account for them during the different phases of the rock engineering design.
This course will try to address this specific issue by presenting the latest scientific discoveries and engineering approaches in the field. It will also present students with innovative methodologies for the quantification of fracture shear strength, rock mass mapping, and rock mass modeling tools such as the Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method for simulating damage and fracture in geomaterials

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CIV1430H
Special Studies in Engineering Rock Mechanics
Prof. John Harrison

This course is aimed at students who have studied soil mechanics and geotechnical engineering at undergraduate level, and who wish to expand their knowledge to include rock mechanics and rock engineering. The course covers fundamental components of rock mechanics (in situ stress, discontinuities, intact rock, rock masses, heterogeneity) before moving on to rock engineering topics (rock excavation and stabilization, foundations and slopes, underground excavations). Course delivery is via lectures, tutorials, and laboratory sessions..

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CIV1498H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Constitutive Modelling in Geomaterials
Prof. Mason Ghafghazi

Special studies courses are offered when a professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1498HS1
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Rock Engineering Design Practice
Prof. John Hadjigeorgiou

This course addresses the fundamentals and practical considerations of reinforcement and support for surface and underground excavations in rock. Topics covered include: Rock mass behaviour and failure mechanisms; Ground support elements and specifications; Ground support "action" and "reaction"; Ground support practice; Data required for support system design; Approaches to ground support design: analytical, empirical, numerical modelling, probabilistic; Monitoring of reinforcement and support; Case studies.
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Special studies courses are offered when a Professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1498HS
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Introduction to Data Science for Civil and Mineral Engineers
Prof. Sebastian Goodfellow

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CIV1499H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Applications of Urban Geology in Civil Engineering
David Staseff

This course will provide students with the foundation for an understanding of geology as it applies to civil / geotechnical engineering in urban areas. Topics include the role and importance of geology in civil / geotechnical engineering practice, including glacial geology and landforms, hydrogeology, urban geology of Canadian cities and case studies with practical applications. This course will not address mining, mineral or rock engineering.

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CIV1499H
New Topics In Civil and Mineral Engineering: Mining and Geomechanics
David Staseff

Special studies courses are offered when a professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

Rock Fracture Dynamics and Induced Seismicity: Experimental Methods
Fractures play a major role in the strength and behaviour of materials at all scales from global earthquakes in rock to grain scale microcracks within individual crystals. Mechanically, cracks make materials more compliant and influence fluid flow. A key consequence of fractures (both density and alignment) is their significant influence upon elastic wave velocity and the development of anisotropy in materials. This course will focus on the experimental imaging of microcracks and fractures in rock and rock like materials using a combination of rock-mechanical and geophysical methods. Induced Seismicity is both a monitoring tool and a hazard and its causes and utilization for engineering the subsurface will be analyzed. Case studies of hydraulic fracturing, waste water injection, deep geological disposal of radioactive waste and mining- induced seismicity will be studied.
The lectures will provide a framework for the geophysical interpretation of fractured materials and induced seismicity. The main focus of the course will be to conduct laboratory-controlled experiments to measure the effect of fractures on the strength and behavior of rock, under simulated earth-like and engineering conditions and interpret the results.

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CIV1499H
Special Studies in Civil Engineering - Tunnelling & Urban Excavations

Special studies courses are offered when a professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1499H
Special Studies in Civil Engineering: Geotechnical Seminars
Prof. Mason Ghafghazi

Special studies courses are offered when a professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1499H
Special Studies in Civil Engineering: Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering
Prof. Mason Ghafghazi

Special studies courses are offered when a professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering

Students will learn about the physical processes that cause earthquakes and how they are used to quantify the effects of earthquakes on built environment. Basic dynamics concepts will be introduced and used to understand how site effects influence the load transferred to structures. Liquefaction will be introduced as a primary source of earthquake-induced damaged to all types of structures and various methods of assessing its potential and consequences will be studied. This course is a necessity for anyone working in geotechnical engineering concerning seismically active parts of the world, and useful to those in earthquake structural engineering area.

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CIV1499H
Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage
Prof. Mason Ghafghazi

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CIV1499HS1
Special Studies in Civil Engineering: Reliability-based Design in Rock Engineering
John Harrison

Modern engineering design codes embrace reliability-based design, and this philosophy is being introduced into geotechnical engineering. However, the application of RBD to rock engineering is not straightforward. Drawing on the instructor’s unique close involvement in the ongoing development of Eurocode 7, this course presents the latest understanding and developments in RBD for rock engineering. The following topics are included: rationale for RBD; computing the probability of failure; simple examples of RBD; application of FORM to rock engineering problems; the problem of limited data; the problem of non-probabilistic uncertainty. Course delivery is via in-person tutorials supported by directed reading and problem-solving.
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Special studies courses are offered when a Professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1499HS2
Special Studies in Civil Engineering - Mining and Geomechanics
Prof. Kamran Esmaeili

Special studies courses are offered when a professor is available to instruct on a new or unusual topic. Each topic offered constitutes one normal half-course. Special studies course codes may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different each time.

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CIV1504H
Applied Probability and Statistics in Civil Engineering
Prof. Khandker Nurul Habib

A lecture and tutorial course designed to build on the prerequisite introduction to probability in the form of applied probability and statistics with emphasis on techniques appropriate for investigating the random behaviour of complex civil engineering systems. Topics include: a review of probability theory; extreme value distributions; engineering reliability; conditional distributions; applications of common probability models; parameter estimation and confidence intervals; significance testing; elementary Bayesian analysis; simple stochastic processes.

Prerequisite: CIV263H1 or equivalent.

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CIV1505H
Transportation Research Seminars
Prof. Marianne Hatzopoulou

This is a credit/non-credit seminar series that is mandatory for research students in the Transportation Research Group. This course does not count toward program course requirements. Talk to your supervisor for more information on how this course fits into your program.

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CIV1506H
Freight Transportation and ITS Applications
Dr. Tho Van Le

Efficient movement of freight is crucial for national economic viability. This course introduces the structure of the freight industry and relates it to business logistics and planning of supply chains. Planning of freight services at the strategic, tactical, and operational levels is presented and models of international, inter-city, and urban freight movements are introduced. Shipper behavior related to mode choice, carrier selection, adoption of 3-PL and information technology options is considered. The course also introduces the role of advanced technologies (ITS) in improving freight operations, and the implications of e-commerce on planning of freight services. The course concludes by providing an overview of policy issues, data sources and needs, and the particularities of the Canadian freight transportation context.

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CIV1508H
Airport Planning and Engineering

The objective of this course is to provide an overview of the planning, design and operation of the airport component of a modern air/highway inter-modal transportation system including airside, terminal and groundside elements. Students will be introduced to current trends in the air transportation industry as these impact on air travel demand and the requirement for airport facilities and services. Aviation demand forecasting and management will be studied, as will aircraft and passenger characteristics. A central focus of the course will be airfield (runways and taxiways) and terminal design, both passenger and cargo. While Canadian standards will be used in all design examples and exercises, these are generally compatible with ICAO recommended practices and the analytic methods broadly applicable elsewhere. Case Studies will draw heavily on the current Master Plan being developed for Pickering Airport and the ongoing development program at Toronto's Lester B. Pearson International Airport. The course will conclude with a brief look at the critical environmental issues facing airports, particularly noise and water pollution, and at airport economics and finance.

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CIV1532H
Fundamentals of ITS and Traffic Management

This course focuses on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) with emphasis on Advanced Traffic Control and Management Systems (ATMS) and applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in ATMS. Topics include:

Overview and Introduction to ITS

Traffic Flow Modeling for ITS: Macroscopic, Microscopic and Mesoscopic

Transportation Networks Modeling and Traffic Assignment

Genetic Algorithms (GA) for Optimization (Artificial Intelligence Part I)

Applications of GA: Emergency Evacuation Optimization, Origin-Destination Estimation, Dynamic Congestion Pricing

Artificial Neural Networks (Artificial Intelligence Part II)

Applications of NN: Automated Incident Detection (AID), Short-Term Traffic Flow Forecasting,

Traffic Control and Optimization Theoretical Primer

Reinforcement Learning (Artificial Intelligence Part III)

Introduction to Deep Learning (Deep NN + RL)

Freeway Traffic Control and Optimization

Street Traffic Control and Optimization

Other Research Topics (time permitting), e.g. Modelling and Exploiting Vehicle Automation and Connectivity for 21s Century Traffic Control.

Prerequisite: CIV332H1.

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CIV1535H
Transportation and Development
Prof. Eric Miller

The land use - transportation interaction is the focus of this course. Basic concepts underlying urban spatial processes are introduced. Land use forecasting models used to project future land use (principally population and employment distributions) for input into transportation planning studies are presented. Models reviewed include the Lowry Model, econometric-based models and urban simulation techniques. The remainder of the course deals with the qualitative and quantitative assessment of impacts of major transportation facilities on land use patterns. A term project dealing with the analysis of the impact of a current transportation proposal within the Greater Toronto Area on adjacent land use constitutes an important component of the course work.

Prerequisite: CIV531H

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CIV1536H
Modelling Transport Emissions
Prof. Marianne Hatzopoulou

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CIV1538H
Transportation Demand Analysis
Prof. Khandker Nurul Habib

This course deals with the quantitative analysis and modeling of transportation demand for planning purposes. The course principally deals with urban passenger demand, but an introduction to freight and intercity travel demand is also provided. A theoretical framework for the study of transportation demand is developed from basic micro-economic principles of consumer behaviour. The primary modeling approaches considered are: disaggregate choice models; entropy-based models, and an introduction to the activity-based approach to travel demand modeling. An understanding of the theory of the demand for transportation is coupled with practical experience in the specification, estimation, and use of transportation demand models.

Prerequisites: CIV531H1,CIV1504H

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CIV1540H
Transportation: Urban Operations Research
Prof. Amer Shalaby

This course focuses on quantitative methods and techniques for the analysis and modelling of urban transportation systems. Major topics include probabilistic modelling, queuing models of transport operations, network models, and simulation of transportation systems. The application of these methods to modelling various components of the transportation system (including road, transit and pedestrian facilities) is emphasized in this course.

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CME500H
Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage
Prof. Lesley Warren

Geochemistry of acid rock / acid mine drainage (ARD/AMD) which covers the role of bacteria in generating this global mining pollution issue and how mines currently treat and attempt to prevent it. An introduction to the underlying chemical reactions involved, the role of microbes in these processes and the mitigation and treatment strategies currently available.

* Course offering pending Faculty Council approval for 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisite: APS110H1/CHE112H1 or equivalent.

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CME525H1
Tunneling and Urban Excavation

Introduces fundamental concepts of underground tunneling and its impact on surrounding urban environment. Topics: role of geology on the choice of tunneling methodology; classical and mechanized tunneling excavation methods; interaction between tunnel and surrounding structures; tunnel support methodologies; innovation and current research in tunneling and underground construction.

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MIN511H
Integrated Mine Waste Engineering
Prof. Murray Grabinsky

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Courses offered by other Academic Units

Course CodeTitle & DescriptionInstructorSessionDay(s)Start TimeEndLocation(s)Section
APS530HProf. David Meyer (né Prof. David Taylor)Scheduled by the Office of the Faculty Registrar.
APS1001HScheduled by Engineering Graduate Studies
APS1004HScheduled by the Engineering Graduate Studies
APS1005HScheduled by the Engineering Graduate Studies
APS1017HScheduled by the Engineering Graduate Studies
APS1024H
Scheduled by the Engineering Graduate Studies
APS1025HScheduled by the Engineering Graduate Studies
CHE1134HScheduled by the Department of Chemical Engineering
CHE1150HScheduled by the Department of Chemical Engineering
CHE1180HScheduled by the Department of Chemical Engineering
CHE1431HScheduled by the Department of Chemical Engineering
CHE1432HScheduled by the Department of Chemical Engineering
CHE2504HScheduled by the Department of Chemical Engineering
CHL5903HScheduled by the Dalla Lana School of Public Health
ECE1092HScheduled by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
ENV1001HScheduled by the School of the Environment
ENV1004HScheduled by the School of the Environment
ENV1701HScheduled by the School of the Environment
ENV1703HScheduled by the School of the Environment
ENV4001HScheduled by the School of the Environment
ENV4002HScheduled by the School of the Environment
GGR1214HScheduled by the Department of Geography & Planning
GLA2091HLesley HersteinScheduled by the Munk School of Global Affairs
JCC1313HScheduled by the Department of Chemical Engineering
JGE1212HScheduled by the Department of Geography & Planning
JGE1413HScheduled by the Department of Geography & Planning
JNC2503HScheduled by the Department of Chemical Engineering
JNP1016HScheduled by the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology
JPG1406HScheduled by the Department of Geography & Planning
JPG1419HScheduled by the Department of Geography & Planning
JPG1421HScheduled by the Department of Geography & Planning
MIE507HProf. Marianne TouchieScheduled by the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering
MIE515HScheduled by Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
MIE1120HScheduled by the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering
MIE1240HScheduled by the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering
MIE1303HScheduled by the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering
MIE1413HScheduled by the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering
MIE1715HScheduled by the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

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